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The Autumn 2020 issue of Mercury (Vol. 49 no. 4) is available to members, featuring the first five years of gravitational-wave detections, future observatories designed to catch more of these ripples in space time, ancient Egyptian astronomy, and more!

At about 6:10 pm Eastern today, a NASA spacecraft will touch an asteroid, grab a 2-ounce sample of debris, and hold onto it until a return to Earth. At least, that’s the plan of this first attempt at the OSIRIS-REx mission’s complex series of events.

The Summer 2020 issue of Mercury (Vol. 49 no. 3) is available to members, featuring discoveries from the Gaia spacecraft, news about the brightest Northern Hemisphere comet in decades, a poet's exploration of the Solar System, and more!

Astronomers have found signs of a molecule in the atmosphere of Venus, one that, on Earth, only microbes can create in large amounts.

NASA’s TESS spacecraft has completed its primary two-year mission and discovered 66 exoplanets and another 2,000 candidates.

A 3-inch-diameter support cable at the Arecibo Observatory snapped and tore a 100-foot-long gash in the observatory dish.

The Spring 2020 issue of Mercury (Vol. 49 no. 2) is available to members, featuring the people behind the Hubble Space Telescope, how Hubble data has changed astronomy, how teachers are responding to COVID-19, and more.

I’m thrilled to be the new Editor of both Mercury (the magazine) and Mercury Online (the blog companion).

The Winter 2020 issue (vol. 49 no. 1) of Mercury magazine is online for ASP members, featuring a goodbye to Spitzer, kicking off a busy decade for Mars, and paying tribute to Katherine Johnson.

Astronomers have discovered that our galaxy’s supermassive black hole is a track and field superstar.

During a recent trip to Hawai’i, I spoke with Keck Observatory’s chief scientist to find out how the Thirty Meter Telescope dispute has affected operations.

Formal and informal learning have their pros and cons, but the ASP is at the intersection working to get the best out of both.

Welcome to Mercury magazine’s new online destination: Mercury Online!

What’s careening through the galaxy at 2.5 million miles per hour and screaming with gamma-rays?

After arriving at Bennu on December 31, mission scientists with NASA’s OSIRIS-REx quickly realized their spacecraft was orbiting a different kind of asteroid.

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