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Mercury Online

What Is Mercury Online?

Mercury Online is the companion blog for Mercury magazine, a quarterly publication that's been bringing space and astronomy news to ASP members since 1972. Mercury Online will showcase articles by our expert columnists after they've been published in Mercury magazine. Support our mission and become an ASP member today to read Mercury articles before they appear on Mercury Online and get access to members-only features.


Lunar rocks retain a million-year record of solar energetic particles and galactic cosmic rays.

Without her, the Hubble Space Telescope may not have gotten off the ground.

Computing celestial alignments may be routine today, but for medieval astronomers it was a major undertaking.

How a mission designed to monitor climate change is also a prototype for a technique to detect gravitational waves. [Feature excerpt]

NASA's OSIRIS-REx gets a beautiful crescent view of the asteroid, revealing the incredible array of rocks on its surface.

It’s important for every learner to see themselves reflected in the ongoing exploration of the universe.

On April 11, Israel’s dreams of landing its first spacecraft on the Moon ended after Beresheet crashed into the lunar surface—but it wasn't a failure, not by a long shot. [Feature excerpt]

Welcome to Mercury magazine’s new online destination: Mercury Online!

A cautionary tale about never underestimating a class full of Astro101 students.

The collaboration’s first image has given us a glimpse of what the future of event horizon studies may look like.

Lunar eclipses can help us understand meteoroid impacts and exoplanet atmospheres.

What’s careening through the galaxy at 2.5 million miles per hour and screaming with gamma-rays?

There are some strange similarities between ultra-faint dwarf galaxies and globular clusters—with dark matter anchoring both.

How the event helped a 14th Century astronomer reconnect with Ptolemy’s era.

How supermassive black holes and galaxies evolve together is one of the biggest questions hanging over modern astrophysics.

After arriving at Bennu on December 31, mission scientists with NASA’s OSIRIS-REx quickly realized their spacecraft was orbiting a different kind of asteroid.

After decades of wondering, the Event Horizon Telescope has revealed what a black hole really looks like. [Feature excerpt]

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